At the 2016 meeting of the ASA Digital Humanities Caucus, we recognized two projects with the newly established Garfinkel Prize in Digital Humanities. Narratives of Displacement and Resistance, Anti-Eviction Mapping Project was named the prize winner and Early African American Film: Reconstructing the History of Silent Race Films, 1909-1930 was named honorable mention.

This award honors caucus founder Susan Garfinkel for her longstanding service to the caucus and her commitment to an inclusive, interdisciplinary, welcoming Digital Humanities. The annual award recognizes excellent work at the intersection of American Studies and Digital Humanities and accepts submissions from all including college and university faculty; public scholars; university and K-12 educators including contingent faculty; students at the graduate, undergraduate, and even K-12 level; activists; artists; and all other researchers, creators, and thinkers. Projects can include those in pedagogy, research, documentary, critical making, digital art, and all other forms. For this first year, we received a diverse and impressive array of projects

Narratives of Displacement and Resistance, Anti-Eviction Mapping Project

Screenshot of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project
Screenshot of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project


Narratives of Displacement and Resistance, Anti-Eviction Mapping Project presents a combination of mapping and oral history to document displacement and home in the San Francisco Bay Area. This project combines quantitative data analysis and qualitative storytelling to show a complex picture of the displacement of San Francisco residents in the wake of an economic boom in the technology sector. Reviewers were impressed by the interdisciplinary, mixed methods approached and the project’s profound engagement with issues of justice, urban development, and local politics.

Early African American Film

Screenshot of Early African American Film
Screenshot of Early African American Film


Early African American Film presents a data set related to the history of African American silent film production. The site includes data visualizations on the films and the people who made them. This site presents a compelling and overlooked history, and reviewers were especially impressed that this began as a student project. 

Thank you to all who submitted work. Details on this year’s prize will be posted in the spring.

Post date: January 26, 2017